One of the greatest travelers of all time is James A. Michener. Here is a video biography of his life.

In this video, "James A. Michener," Mary Carroll provides a lucid biography of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author.

James A Michener Traveler

Born on February 3, 1907, in Doylestown, Penn., Michener was raised by his adoptive Quaker mother, Mabel Michener. He excelled in school, graduating from Swarthmore College summa cum laude in 1929. After a two-year trip to Europe, he returned to the United States and taught English for three years at George School in Newtown, Penn. He earned an M.A. from Colorado State Teacher’s College and began his career there, before enlisting in the Navy at the outbreak of World War II.

It was during the war that Michener began his writing career. He published his first novel, "Tales of the South Pacific," in 1947, inspired by his experience as a naval lieutenant in the South Pacific.

Over the course of his life, Michener published 40 works, selling an estimated 75 million copies worldwide. Among his most popular works are "Tales of the South Pacific," "Alaska," "The Source," "Texas," and "The Covenant." He won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948 and earned the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977.

Married three times, Michener wrote "Sayonara" (1954) in tribute to his third wife, Mari Yoriko Sabusawa, a Japanese American.

In his final years, he lived in Austin, Texas. He was a fierce supporter of the Texas Longhorn Women’s Basketball Team, and founded an MFA program at the University of Texas at Austin, later called the Michener Center for Writers.

Michener died on October 16, 1997, at age 90.

 

He has been honored with numerous tributes, including the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Penn., the Michener Library of the University of Northern Colorado, and in 2008, the U.S. Postal Service issued the Michener stamp.

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Bill99 from has written 6 comments

One of the worlds great writers. He makes you really feel as if you are there or at the very least wish you were.
Ive read about 33 of his works and have never been diappointed.

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